1930s Sew-along with Norma: line sketch of the dress

Naomi of Spare Room Style brought up a good point about the photos of the completed dress.  All the details get lost in the print of the fabric.  At her request I’m uploading a pencil sketch I hope will make the details clear.

1930s20dress20line20sketch_zpsjyyqciro

Details of front of the dress

Bust darts from center of front shoulder to 1″ above apex of bust.
V-neckline with interfacing and facing on inside, bound with bias trim slip stitched into place.
Bodice extends about 2-3″ below widest part of the hip line.  On the Misses Size 4 this is a length about 13″ below the waist.

Details of back of the dress

Center back seam.
Slot zipper application (hand sewn with running stitches).

Flounce

Cut with center front and center back on lengthwise grain.
Two flares each side of center front and center back.

Sleeve

Fitted sleeve.
Vertical dart running from wrist up to elbow.
Sleeve finished with hand sewn bias binding at wrist.
Somewhere between 5 to 9 buttons to be placed along vertical dart line.

Belt

In planning stages.

Pattern Notes

A basic chemise pattern is used for the bodice of the dress.
–Slight shaping was applied from underarm down to end of bodice.  This is not a straight, tubular shape.
–The width at the hipline is widest to accommodate movement and the need for enough fabric so that the dress can be comfortable when the belt is worn.
–The wider the hip line is creates a need for the flares to be slightly wider.  The flares for the size 4 will have a little less depth than the flares for a size 6, 8 or 10.  It is a matter of preserving the overall proportions of the dress.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “1930s Sew-along with Norma: line sketch of the dress

  1. It is good to see all the details – I’m glad you did the sketches. It is a useful way of seeing a garment – I always like to look at the drawings on pattern envelopes – gives agood idea of what’s going on.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks so much Em! It’s great to see all those wonderful details that you don’t appreciate so much on the finished garment as you are too busy being amazed by the whole garment. I love this.

    Liked by 1 person

Comments are closed.